Bishop Olson’s Coat of Arms

By Deacon Paul J. Sullivan

Bp-Olson-Crest-WEB.jpgThe episcopal heraldic achievement, or bishop’s coat of arms, is composed of a shield, the central and most important part of the design, a scroll with a motto, and the external ornamentation. By heraldic tradition, the arms of the bishop of a diocese are joined with the arms of his jurisdiction, seen in the left side of the design. These arms are composed of a blue field, to honor the most Blessed Virgin Mary, on which is displayed a castellated fort in silver (white). Above the fort is a green trefoil (also known as a shamrock), to honor Saint Patrick, the titular of the Cathedral-Church.

For his personal arms, His Excellency, Bishop Olson has adopted a design to signify the important aspects of his life. The upper section, is silver (white) on which is seen a black ring, upon which is a red cross pattée that has on it three interlaced gold (yellow) rings of Irish knot-work. The knots are a traditional representation of The Holy Trinity and are placed on the cross and ring forming the logotype of Holy Trinity Seminary, in Irving, where Bishop Olson served as Rector.

The lower portion is red on which is seen a gold (yellow) sword, for Saint Michael, the Archangel, the Bishop’s Baptismal patron, that has been converted to a pan-balance of justice, to reflect that justice is the prime call of all clerics and most especially bishops. Across the center of the design is a blue bar that bears a spikenard between two roses, all gold (yellow). The spikenard is taken from the arms of our Holy Father, Pope Francis, who appointed Bishop Olson to the episcopacy and is between two roses, one for Mary in her title as Our Lady of Guadalupe, and the other for Saint Therese, the “Little Flower.” For his motto, His Excellency Bishop Olson has chosen the phrase “VERITATIS SPLENDOR,”  the title of an encyclical by Blessed Pope John Paul II. The words “the Splendor of Truth,” express Bishop Olson’s profound belief that the truth of Jesus Christ is splendid beyond belief.

The achievement is completed by the external ornamentation which are a gold (yellow) processional cross, that is placed in back of the shield and which extends above and below the shield, and the pontifical hat, called a “galero,” with its six tassels in three rows on either side of the shield, all in green. These are the heraldic insignia of a prelate of the rank of bishop, by instruction of The Holy See, of March 31, 1969.

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Bp-Olson-as-HTS-rector-Button.jpgFinding Holy Trinity Seminary in Irving used to be a chore. But now thanks to a new sign on Vince Hagan Drive visible from the feeder road for Highway 114, visitors no longer get lost. That sign built in October 2013 is an example not only of the physical changes, but of the welcoming nature of the seminary that are part of the legacy being left by Bishop Michael Olson. Olson served as rector at Holy Trinity from 2008 until his recent appointment as the fourth bishop of Fort Worth.

Bp-Olson-Symbols-of-Office-BUTTON.jpgSymbols of the office of Bishop: Unique invitations to pray for our shepherd

Bishops wear distinctive symbols or insignias, also known as regalia. These religious items, some worn on a regular basis and others only within liturgical celebrations, communicate to us the bishop’s special place within the Church. The bishop, by his ordination, has received the fullness of the Sacrament of Holy Orders, and when we see the bishop wear these symbols, perhaps we should do something more than just be aware of their meaning. The next time you see any of these regalia, consider quietly doing something special for the bishop: Offer a short prayer for him.

Bp-Olson-Crest-BUTTON.jpgThe episcopal heraldic achievement, or bishop’s coat of arms, is composed of a shield, the central and most important part of the design, a scroll with a motto, and the external ornamentation. By heraldic tradition, the arms of the bishop of a diocese are joined with the arms of his jurisdiction, seen in the left side of the design. These arms are composed of a blue field, to honor the most Blessed Virgin Mary, on which is displayed a castellated fort in silver (white). Above the fort is a green trefoil (also known as a shamrock), to honor Saint Patrick, the titular of the Cathedral-Church.

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