Arland Nichols, founder of John Paul II Foundation for Life and Family, addresses UNT pro-life group

By Erica Rohde

Correspondent

October 7, 2014

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Arland Nichols (pictured above in this stock photo) founded the John Paul II Foundation for Life and Family to promote the Culture of Life through education and formation. (Photo courtesy of Arland Nichols)

Pro-life college students sometimes find it difficult to portray and defend what they believe in on a secular campus. In the process they are discovering their peers need scientific reasoning and research to come closer to the truth about human life.

Arland Nichols, a partner of Texas Right to Life and founder of the John Paul II Foundation for Life and Family, addressed this in a lecture he gave at the University of North Texas Sept. 30. Nichols started the foundation to promote the Culture of Life through education and formation, and was invited to the campus by Eagles for Life, the university’s pro-life organization.

 “Today you won’t really notice a Catholic theme in what I’m saying;” Nichos said, “it will be a very secular approach to our question of the day which will be abortion-inducing drugs or FDA-approved, labeled oral contraceptives.”

The topic has become more relevant since the issuing of the Health and Human Services (HHS) mandate requiring health plans to provide contraceptives or sterilizations to women free of cost. Through his research, Nichols discovered an evident contradiction contained in the mandate.

“You had to provide these drugs, and the last statement was ‘this does not include abortifacient drugs,’” Nichols said. “This is simply and blatantly untrue.”

Nichols began by talking about the widely debated question of when life begins. That simple question remains the driver of controversy between those who support the mandate and Catholics and others who feel it violates their pro-life convictions, consciences, and religious liberties.

“Here’s an important point,” Nichols said. “Science shows that life begins at the moment of fertilization, at the moment of conception. That’s independent of any specific ethical, moral, political, religious view of human life or of human embryos.”

Nichols walked the students through the stages in development of the human person. He compared scientific data of the stages of pregnancy to the inconsistent definitions of pregnancy over time created by entities such as the Guttmacher Institute, the former research arm of Planned Parenthood.

“When life begins is not a question, it’s a matter of science,” Nichols said. “I can’t impose that on others. Science imposes it on us. Truth imposes it on us, and we should act, going forward, based upon that.”

Despite clear evidence that the four major contraceptives — combined oral contraceptive pills (OCP), Plan B, the Intrauterine Device (IUD), and Ella — are abortion-inducing, Nichols said, women remain uninformed of the dangers associated with them.

He disclosed information about each one and their individual harmful effects on the endometrium, or inner lining of the uterus, allowing them to have abortion-inducing effects. As an example, Nichols referred to a Mayo Clinic Proceedings article by Dr. Chris Kahlenborn, which points to strong evidence that OCPs can cause early abortions.

Evidence also suggested that Plan B is abortion-inducing.

“Now these studies are not done by Catholics,” Nichols said. “They’re done by advocates of Plan B. They don’t care that there’s an early abortion-inducing effect. It doesn’t matter to them.” But the data they produced, he said, shows very clearly that there likely is an early abortion-inducing effect.

According to Nichols, there is no question as to whether or not IUDs cause early abortion as well, and Ella is the strongest in causing early abortions.

Nichols answered the students’ questions, exposing important points about women’s health, such as the realities of underdiagnosed endometriosis, the faulty research behind the policies of the HHS mandate, and the realities of being pro-life among a largely pro-choice population.

“What I just shared with y’all, politically it’s a losing game,” Nichols said. “I’ll be the first to admit it. When you define life properly,” he said, and advocate for requiring the protection of human life, which begins at fertilization, politically you lose.

 “Is it wise for you to talk to college students about this? They’d be more inclined to be pro-life, because now they know that the contraception they really want is causing early abortions,” Nichols said. “I say people need truth, to be able to make informed decisions.”

Arland-Nichols-BUTTON.jpgPro-life college students sometimes find it difficult to portray and defend what they believe in on a secular campus. In the process they are discovering their peers need scientific reasoning and research to come closer to the truth about human life.

Published (until 10/9/2114)
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